Can a Blind Man Lust?

By Art G. (originally posted to Flickr as Those Eyes) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsPart I in the “Coming to Our Senses” Series

Love comforteth like sunshine after rain,
But Lust’s effect is tempest after sun;
Love’s gentle spring doth always fresh remain,
Lust’s winter comes ere summer half be done;
Love surfeits not, Lust like a glutton dies;
Love is all truth, Lust full of forged lies.
Venus and Adonis by William Shakespeare

So, can a blind man lust?

When we think of lust, we almost immediately think of the eyes. And that brings up beauty, sex, adultery and pornography.

Several years ago, a pastor would drive 90 miles to my house for prayer counseling because he was dealing with an addiction to pornography. He’d heard from friends of the successes we had witnessed through our Theophostic Prayer Ministry practice and desired to be healed from his addiction.

People use addictions to sex, alcohol, food, drugs, smoking, body-modification and even work–anything to numb the emotional pain in their souls.  Addiction to pornography is a pain management problem that manifests as a fixation with false intimacy. It is the pain–and the source of that pain–that must be healed. Often times through traditional counseling, one addiction is removed only to be replaced by another one.  This pattern repeats until the person has a socially-acceptable addiction like “hard worker” (read: workaholic).

This pastor, however, wanted to really be set free from his addiction and not simply transfer it to something else.  So instead of focusing on the fruit of his pain-inducing beliefs (the pornography fixation), we looked beneath the surface to allow the true causes of his pain-medicating behavior to unfold.  Like most folks, this was a methodology foreign, yet familiar to him.

We rarely think about this process of natural association, yet perform it constantly.  Just as we never think about our internal organs until one of them “cries out,” we also do not think about the how or why we make the decisions that we do, or have the emotional responses we do to external stimuli.

Everything that ever happens in our lives is brought into our souls through our marvelous senses and processed and categorized.  It is considered and compared to thousands of “files” from past memory pictures and emotional happenings and then it is acted upon. It happens so fast that it is nearly imperceptible — unless you take the time to ponder it.

Which brings me to our subject: lust.

Lust by itself is not, in fact, a bad word.  It is a neutral word that is absolutely synonymous with the word “covet” and the word “desire.”  The reason I want to slow down and define it is for us to realize the gravity with which we use words.  Even in the English language, lust does not mean “see.”  It does not mean recognize. It does not mean appreciate.  It does not mean despise.  It means hunger, crave, intend to possess.

Depending on the context, lust can mean earnestly desire or it can mean wrongfully desire.

    And [Jesus] said to them, “I have earnestly lusted to eat this Passover with you before I suffer.  (Luke 22:15 ESV)

But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery with her in his heart.  (Jesus speaking in Matthew 5:28 ESV)

Yes, exactly the same word.  Each context determines whether it is “good” lust or “bad” lust.  When we are lazy with language, we end up degrading words and their meanings.  Remember the Ten Commandments? The last one? You shall not Covet?  It is just as accurate to read it You Shall Not Lust…after another man’s wife or possessions.

Is there such a thing as good lust? Perhaps for our ears, the word “desire” sounds more pleasant.  Either way, they’re the same word in the original tongue.  Scripture offers encouragement for positive desires and prohibitions for negatives ones.  Each type is based on the context of the desire.

In summary, Paul writes in Galatians 5:16: “But I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the lusts of the flesh.”  In turn, what we will do is gratify the lusts of the spirit.

What about the blind man? If men are so damnably stimulated by sight, then by definition a blind person could never commit this sin.  Yet, instead of facing the truth that wrongful lust is a matter of the heart, we have gone to the drastic measure of making rules and restrictions of the strictest sort, thinking perhaps that forced blindness is the answer.

The truth is that a blind man can lust and covet wrongfully any of the things or persons that a sighted man or woman can.  It is not the physical attributes that endanger us. It is the evil intentions of our hearts.  Wrongful lust requires intent to possess.

In the next post, we’ll delve into a deeper subject: visual stimulation. Stay tuned!

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